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Pinterest’s festive name for Private Boards (“Secret Boards”) reserves their right to take it back

Just calling this out:

Starting today, we’ll be gradually rolling out a test that enables anyone to create three secret boards

A test.

Secret as in Santa. Secret as in seasonal.

Not Private as in permanent.

Any other social network woulda called this “Private.”

Not like I’m Sherlock Holmes over here:

Thanks for all your feedback, and for trying secret boards with us! 

So they’re trying it out. They know people have been dying for any sort of access control. But don’t quiiiite wanna commit to offering it.

Christmas is the perfect cover

Respect. 

pinterblog:

The holidays are a time for being with family, sharing great meals, and, of course, surprising your favorite people with a special gift.  That’s why we thought the holidays were a perfect time to test one of our most frequently-requested features: secret boards! Starting today, we’ll be gradually rolling out a test that enables anyone to create three secret boards.

We hope that secret boards will make Pinterest even more useful. You can use secret boards to keep track of holiday gifts, plan a special event, or work on a project you aren’t yet ready to share with the rest of the world. You can keep your secret boards to yourself or invite family and friends to pin with you.

To create a secret board from the web, visit your profile and scroll down to the bottom. Then, click Create a Secret Board. You can also click Add+ on the top right-hand corner of Pinterest to select Create Board and turn the Secret button to On.





If you’re on your mobile device, first download the most recent version of Pinterest for iPhone, iPad, Android phone or Android tablet. 


Then, go to your profile, tap on the Boards tab, and scroll down to the bottom until you see a button that says Create a Secret Board.









When you add a pin to a secret board, it won’t show up anywhere else on Pinterest—the only place you can see it is on your secret board.  Right now, you can’t make existing boards secret because others people may have already repinned from your board.  See this support article to learn more about secret boards.

Finally, secret boards were not on the horizon when we last revised our Privacy Policy, so we’ve updated that document. While we were adding secret boards to the policy, we also took the opportunity to simplify the overall language of the policy and provide more examples.  We think the result is a much clearer and more understandable policy for the non-lawyers who use Pinterest.  In addition to this blog post, we’ll be sending an email notification about the privacy policy update.





Thanks for all your feedback, and for trying secret boards with us! We hope they’ll be a big part of your holiday planning and we can’t wait to hear how you use them.  Tell us your plans in the comments!

Evrhet Milam, Software Engineer, Currently obsessed with pinning to shoes.

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How a sketchy Russian underground economy democratizes… your marketing

In social media, so much stuff is undocumented by social platform vendors:

  • What is the specific maximum number of tweets you’re allowed to send per hour? (You get 1000 tweets per day. But beyond that, it gets fuzzy.)
  • Why does Pinterest sometimes tell you “Slow down, you’re Pinning too fast?” What, exactly, is “too fast?”

You don’t have to be a spammer to hit limits when you’re doing something creative on a social platform [example: Firstborn’s epic Pinterest hack for Uniqlo].

So how do you figure this stuff out? Well, if you’re a huge brand spending a bit on paid media, you may have an account contact inside company who can feed you the inside dirt.

But another great way of figuring out all this undocumented stuff is hanging out with spammers/blackhat marketers (not in real life. in forums, chat, etc). As annoying as hearing about Viagra on Twitter is, the people behind those accounts actually talk to each other and share stuff they’ve figured out about Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, etc.

I’m not very interested in the field of “security” (firewall rules? zzzZZZZ). But there are areas of the domain that actually end up being really related to modern marketing.

For this reason, my ears and eyes perk up around stuff like Trend Micro’s recent research paper: Russian Underground 101 (warning: PDF link). (source of the image above)

While half of it is about straight-up illegal, destructive stuff that in no way would benefit a legit business (denial of service attacking a call center?!? yikes! (and also: why?)), the other half dances around stuff that any hands-on social media marketer has to interact with if he/she is a power user: proxy servers, VPNs, seo, traffic.

Trend Micro’s report is a read-only, and extremely high-level survey of the field. WiredUK(quoted below) wrote a feature with an hacker-heavy interpretation of the report.

Ultimately, the i-want-to-hack-a-person (boo!) communities are quite different and usually separate from the i-want-to-hack-a-platform communities. The latter will get you much closer to understanding modern platforms. Stuffy suits and law and enforcement tend to conflate the two. (For example, the reports covers both.) But  basically if you’re a marketer: the former is a bit more boring/irrelevant.

So what’s the lesson for today? If you’re never satisfied with social platform documentation, you gotta stop depending on “official” documentation, and start listening to some shady characters. Turns out, they’re pretty reliable.

If you don’t wanna bother with that, you can subscribe to my mailing list, but I’m way more boring than spammers.

If you want to buy a botnet, it’ll cost you somewhere in the region of $700. If you just want to hire someone else’s for an hour, though, it can cost as little as $2—that’s long enough to take down, say, a call center, if that’s what you were in the mood for. Maybe you’d like to spy on an ex—for $350 you can purchase a trojan that lets you see all their incoming and outgoing texts. Or maybe you’re just in the market for some good, old-fashioned spamming—it’ll only cost you $10 for a million e-mails. That’s the hourly minimum wage in the UK.

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What if you thought every Phillies fan was repping Pinterest?
In any case… good eye, good eye! I def saw the Path/Pinterest style-bite before. But never considered the Phillies aphinity [sic].
xtothequ:

my tumblr is not the best vehicle to discuss logos and branding, but up until just recently, i thought people wearing Phillies caps worked for/were really into Path or Pinterest.
i suppose fans of these respective brands wouldn’t be confused, but for the longest time i was like “weird, i guess Pinterest has a larger male following than i thought?” nope, wrong.
*Brand New is my preferred place to nerd out about these types of things.

What if you thought every Phillies fan was repping Pinterest?

In any case… good eye, good eye! I def saw the Path/Pinterest style-bite before. But never considered the Phillies aphinity [sic].

xtothequ:

my tumblr is not the best vehicle to discuss logos and branding, but up until just recently, i thought people wearing Phillies caps worked for/were really into Path or Pinterest.

i suppose fans of these respective brands wouldn’t be confused, but for the longest time i was like “weird, i guess Pinterest has a larger male following than i thought?” nope, wrong.

*Brand New is my preferred place to nerd out about these types of things.

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Pinterest moved to a new Tumblr, you gotta refollow

Short version:

If you followed Pinterest’s Tumblr (blog) from inside Tumblr, you have to refollow it, because they made a new one.

Long version:

africaistheefuture:

Growth! @Pinterest moving blog from Tumblr to onsite

pinterest:

The Pinterest blog has moved. Please visit blog.pinterest.com

Pinterest didn’t move off of Tumblr, they’re still on it. Their blog post wasn’t very clear.

But if you’re on Tumblr, you do have to re-follow it.

Why the confusion? They set up a new Tumblr. (If you wanna get technical, their old Tumblr was "pinterest" (.tumblr.com) and their new Tumblr is "pinterblog.”(.tumblr.com). Both are/were mapped to http://blog.pinterest.com.

Old (Dashboard screenshot)

New (Dashboard screenshot)

How I figured it out:

Last night Pinterest tweeted a new blog post, that didn’t show up in my Tumblr dashboard. Confused, I visited it, and the Tumblr “follow” button appeared, despite the fact that I already followed Pinterest’s Tumblr. (Or so I thought. Mystery! Intrigue! *X-Files song.*

They might have done this because they wanted a group Tumblr, and you can’t make your primary Tumblr a group Tumblr.

They also changed their avi + theme. (Looks great!)

As of now, the old Tumblr still lives at http://pinterest.tumblr.com.

RIP, that tumblr/theme. 

So… just to recap: If you followed Pinterest on Tumblr, you have to refollow, coz technically it’s a whole new Tumblr.

(Source: pinterest-ben)

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Pinterest registration is now open.

Pinterest announces open registration. Invites needed no more.

The first thing that may be popping into your brain is “spam.” After all, what was the point of making Pinterest invite-only? If everybody is vouched for by an existing user, then theoretically any additional user who chooses to spam has to betray the friend who invited him/her.

Let’s just say, at some point somebody got betrayed.

And once there’s a patient zero of spamming, the sanctity of the invite-only system doesn’t exist. That happened a long time ago, at least as early as January 2012. At this point, all the invite-only system does is slow down Pinterest’s growth.

So I like the new set-up.

Twitter/Facebook sign-up still required, so it’s not totally open season for spam. Still a bit of friction.

Guess the one thing that would make me happier. Animated .gif support.

One day. #dreams

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Pinterest blogs their new categories

Pinterest acknowledges the new categories, but not a peep about the here-for-three-days corgi category.

pinterest:

If you’re brand new to Pinterest and want to discover more pins apart from people you follow, Pinners would tell you to check out the Categories. Clicking the Categories menu lets you view whole sections of pins about your favorite interests, whether it’s “Food & Drink”, “Architecture”, or “Home Decor”.

Now, we’re very excited to announce new categories on Pinterest, including “Quotes”, “Tattoos”, and “Weddings”!

All our old categories have also been improved so you should see less miscategorized pins as you browse. We’ll always be adjusting our technologies to make them more accurate, but we really appreciate the feedback we received to get us to this point.

Lastly, we tweaked a few category names to better showcase the interests and communities we’ve seen grow on Pinterest. For example, “Pets” is now “Animals”, and “Prints & Posters” is freshly minted as “Illustrations & Posters”.

These changes will be rolling out to everyone over the next week, so don’t be worried if you don’t notice them immediately.

We hope you’ll go give the categories a look and have fun repinning or following some new Pinners. And, if you’ve always wondered how to show off your pins in the category feeds, you can read our best practices here.

Happy exploring and happy pinning!

(Source: pinterest-ben)

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New Pinterest categories in full effect

Notice anything different?

Notice any new… cateCORGIes categories on Pinterest?

[update July 23rd: The Corgi category is gone, after about 3 days! RIP Corgi-era. Also confirmed: many users are not seeing the refresh at all yet.]

Sometime around July 19th, Pinterest added a few new categories, removed a couple, and edited a few.

I couldn’t find any official or unnofficial documentation of this, so here’s a full run-down of the diff:

  • Animals (new)
  • Architecture
  • Art
  • Cars & Motorcycles
  • Celebrities (new)
  • Corgis (new) [update: gone. just lasted a few days :( ]
  • Design
  • DIY & Crafts
  • Education
  • Film, Music, and Books
  • Fitness -> Health & Fitness
  • Food & Drink
  • Gardening
  • Geek
  • Hair & Beauty
  • History
  • Holidays -> Holidays & Events
  • Home Décor
  • Humor
  • Kids
  • My Life
  • Women’s Apparel -> Women’s Fashion 
  • Men’s Apparel -> Men’s Fashion
  • Outdoors
  • People
  • Pets -> Animals
  • Photography
  • Print & Posters -> Illustrations & Posters
  • Products
  • Quotes (new)
  • Science & Nature
  • Sports
  • Tattoos (new)
  • Technology
  • Travel & Places -> Travel
  • Wedding & Events -> Weddings
  • Other

If you like nerding out about Pinterest and tracking changes in platforms like Twitter, Tumblr, etc… you should definitely follow me on Twitter. I don’t shut up about this stuff.

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Uniqlo gamed Pinterest. You could, too.

Anybody who manages brands on Pinterest (or any social media site) knows that there are undocumented and documented rate-limits and anti-spam measures to consider. For example, most of us know that Twitter has follow limits, tweet limits, search limits, and there are many ways to “trip the wire” with innocent behavior. Twitter Jail is real, people. 

Pinterest is no different. Many of us in the trenches have attempted to document the undocumented. We’ve bashed keyboards as innocent brand interactions have temporarily hand-cuffed retail accounts. We’ve tried to reverse-engineer the secret combination that leads some dumb pins to get on a Category pages while other excellent Pins remain invisible… (Some of us have figured it out, but that’s not what this post is about. Besides, it’s a moving target.)

So it was with much titillation that I watched the Uniqlo Pinterest campaign by Firstborn. (video above). I wanna say they “hacked Pinterest.” Technically they gamed Pinterest. (They say they “took it over.”) No matter what you wanna call it, they manipulated stuff, and it was pretty dang cool. Respect.

There are no links I can give you. The living, breathing, unpredictable nature of Pinterest means that there’s a chance no user will actually see anything like this again without the live, rapid fire, repetitive posting by a bunch of people behind the scenes (They admit to 100 accounts. No doubt this actual effect lasted for a very short time, perhaps less than 30 minutes). What they achieved was something Black Hat Internet Marketers do every day- got multiple instances of the same brand on the Category page by having multiple accounts post there at once. Only when Uniqlo did it, it was really, really pretty. :D

Pinterest has suspended accounts for less, though there’s a chance they got a heads up about this Pin storm. Though Pinterest has no self-serve brand services, there’s also a chance there was some bespoke action behind the scenes to even assist Uniqlo and Firstborn.

What I love about this campaign is that it really brings home a point I try to make regularly with people: there are no secret tricks here. Big brands have the same tools and options that you do. In this case they had to make a bunch of “regular” accounts and get creative. Firstborn and Uniqlo used Pinterest as canvas to express a vision. They didn’t rely on the “join the conversation” social media trope.

There’s no excuse to feel limited, go out and make cool stuff!